When To Say "When"

A guide to putting inactive prospects in your rear view mirror

Ever had a prospect that looks so good, but is always just beyond your reach? Maybe they will decide next week, have to check the budget, the excuses are endless. How do you know when you need to move on? Time management is one the crucial elements of the sales process. These prospects can be time suckers.

In the past 30 years in sales, I've learned a lot. I've also experienced failures, but from those failures I've learned the most. The road to success can sometimes be a little bumpy, but I've narrowed down the lessons I've learned and will share my three keys to success with you. These are my three sales mantras. Think of them as bumper stickers.

In the build-up to a first meeting, there are details and tasks that shouldn't be delayed until you are between the reception and the boardroom on the day itself. All of your investment up to now and potential revenue hinges on this meeting, so it'd be inexcusable to go in unprepared.

Having found the business you were looking for and spent some time looking in from the outside, observing all you can, it's time to make contact. There's no time to stop, in awe of the bright lights, you need to move while the lead is fresh and your research is relevant.

At the start of the sales journey, the road can look a little empty. When previous success stories are left behind and what's ahead is all that matters, there's an understandable tendency to feel overwhelmed or frightened of the unknown. For the best sales professionals though, lead generation means new business and is seen as an opportunity.

What should managers be doing to coach the sales people who need it? What are the things that can be coached on that can change productivity substantially?

When presented with a response such as, "I can't afford this" or "I don't have any money" there are a number of rebuttals that you can utilize to overcome this objection.

All too often, sales managers and salespeople pass off hype as enthusiasm, whether consciously or not. Hype appeals to the imagination, both on the part of the salesperson and customer. The problem with hype and imagination during the sales of product is that both always exceed whatever features/benefits said product might convey in reality. Nine times out of ten, this is a recipe for an unhappy customer. In sales, walking the fine line between enthusiasm and factual details is challenging but not impossible. The key to speaking frankly about the benefits of any product is

If you are in sales or looking to get into sales, you need to add the CPSP Certification to your resume!

All top sales people are vigilant about how they spent their time, and ensure that they are spending their time on those activities that lead to the highest return-on-time.